Android M is now officially called 6.0 Marshmallow next version of Google’s O.S

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Google released the first developer preview of Android 6.0 in May, giving us a good idea of what to expect from the next version of the operating system that powers millions of smartphones, tablets, TV, boxes, and smartwatches. But it wasn’t called Android 6.0

android-m-6-0

Android M was unveiled during Google’s annual I/O conference last May and is expected to become publicly available this fall. The next major Android version will be trying to optimize the performance even further by lowering the RAM usage, improving the standby and overall battery endurance.

Android M will also introduce native support for fingerprint sensors and security authentications. An official app permission manager is coming too, as well as support for USB Type-C connectors and capability for charging other devices.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow new Developer’s Preview is now available on Nexus 5, 6, 9 and the Nexus Player. The preview will be the last one before the RTM version.

The official SDK is live as well. The devs can now upload their Android 6.0 compatible apps to the Play Store.

Marshmallow should make it first on the Nexus devices this fall.

Among other things, Android M brings more user control over which permission an app can use, automatic cloud backups of app data (for apps that support the feature), changes to the way USB flash drives and microSD cards can be used, a System UI tuner that lets you add or remove Quick Settings tiles, and reduced power consumption when your device is inactive.

There’s also native support for fingerprint readers and a new Android Pay platform for secure mobile payments on devices with NFC capabilities.

Here’s a short demo video showing the first Android M developer preview. A few things may look different by the time Android 6.0 launches.

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